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Category: Healing plants

Thuja Occidentalis

Thuja Occidentalis

Thuja Occidentalis, Arborvitae – release from self-sabotage “The complicity [between victim and perpetrator] implies a kind of contact of sin, with both parties falling short of God’s command. Perpetrators who harm others are obviously sinners, but so are the people they harm, who may well believe they are being justly punished by a higher power. The wrong done to victims is due to the wrong they have done in the eyes of God. To make matters worse, the twisted syntax…

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Pine Pollen Boost

Pine Pollen Boost

Pine pollen is nature’s perfect boost for good health and the immune system. Pine pollen is ‘the sperm’ of the pine tree and almost  the same structure as human testosterone. It is the most abundant source of testosterone in the plant kingdom.  Isn’t that interesting?  What reason could our Great Mother have for making this source of human testosterone in vastly more quantities than is needed for the trees alone.  A single mature pine tree can produce 1-3kg of pine…

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Cleavers (Galium aparine)

Cleavers (Galium aparine)

Galium aparine has many common names including cleavers, clivers, goosegrass, catchweed, stickyweed, robin-run-the-hedge, sticky willy, sticky willow, velcro weed and it is an excellent spring tonic.  It grabs your attention and hangs on, quite literally, when you first venture into the garden after a winter absence.  Its fresh, clean, greenness oozes such vitality that when I first noticed it here I knew it must be good for something.  It appears here after the winter rain and seems to love growing…

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St John’s Wort

St John’s Wort

St John’s Wort, Hypericum perforatum, is one of my favourite healing plants. It grows all over around here, more abundantly each year.  The healing plants are like that, the more they are appreciated, the more they grow.  St Johns Wort is said to be named after St John, because it begins flowering on St John’s day, the 24th June.  The bright yellow flowers look like the sun, star-shaped with stamens shooting out like tiny sun rays. From Matthew Woods, The…

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Chamomile/manzanilla

Chamomile/manzanilla

Chamomile/manzanilla grows wild around here and I’ve been picking and drying it.  It smells beautiful and fresh and tastes much nicer than any of the commercial versions.  Only a few heads are needed for a cup, which I sweeten slightly with local honey.  I also use it when it’s cooled down as a compress for tired or irritated eyes – especially for the dogs.